Friday, January 1, 2010

Blackwater charges dismissed


DC Federal Judge Ricardo Urbina has thrown out all charges against the five Blackwater mercenaries accused of running amuck in the streets of Iraq in 2007. The men shot and killed seventeen civilians, and wounded twenty-seven others. In their defense, they claimed that someone had shouted disparaging words at them.

"Disparaging words were used, and dirty looks were given," said Judge Urbina, "but that is not the reason this case is being dismissed. The plain and simple fact is that Blackwater no longer exists, and ipso facto, there are no longer any Blackwater mercenaries. It's crazy, I tell ya, but rest assured that if this case had reached me before Blackwater changed their name to Xe Services, I would have thrown the book at these bad boys."

Many Iraqis were unpleasantly surprised by the decision, particularly those who are still among the living.

"I'm miffed," said Sami Hawas, a paralyzed former taxi driver who was shot in the back during the incident. "Very aggravated. My understanding of corporate law is limited, however, and I suppose that if these men were released on a technicality, that's just the way it goes. Still, it doesn't seem quite fair."

"Of course people are not going to like it because they believe these individuals conducted some violence and should be punished for it,” said General Ray Odierno, the American commander in Iraq. “But the bottom line is, using the rule of law, the evidence obviously was not there, or was collected illegally, or the company changed their name, or whatever. It's always something. But it’s a lesson in the rule of law."

Ali Khalaf, who is a policeman that was on duty during the incident, also describes himself as somewhat displeased by the ruling.

"What can we say?" he asks. "They killed people. They probably gave a bribe to get released. This is their own American court system. I ask you, if this had happened to Americans, what would be the result?"

"Let me reply to Mr Khalaf," responded Nevada inmate O. J. Simpson. "First off, you don't try to bribe a Federal judge - that's against the law. But if this had happened in America, the friends and relatives would have simply picked themselves up, dusted themselves off, and filed a nonsensical civil law suit in order to try and take all of the poor fool's hard-earned assets. That's what they would do in America."

4 comments:

  1. Thus they sign the death sentence for the rule of law. The rich march forward blindly for all their education and advantages.

    The dark times are descending (again) while the upper classes party away.

    "They were careless people, Tom and Daisy - they smashed up things and creatures and then retreated back into their money or their vast carelessness or whatever it was that kept them together, and let other people clean up the mess they had made"

    "So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past."

    -Scott Fitzgerald

    Gatsby used to be my favorite novel. But his short story, "The Rich Boy" was more telling.

    "Let me tell you about the very rich. They are different from you and me. They possess and enjoy early, and it does something to them, makes them soft, where we are hard, cynical where we are trustful, in a way that, unless you were born rich, it is very difficult to understand."

    S

    “But the bottom line is, using the rule of law, the evidence obviously was not there, or was collected illegally, or the company changed their name, or whatever. It's always something. But it’s a lesson in the rule of law."

    ReplyDelete